Monthly Archives: January 2011

How to Get a Bigger Paycheque

Have you ever heard of a Source Deduction Waiver?

Every payday your employer deducts the amount of  tax set by the Canada Revenue Agency. This money is applied against your annual tax bill.

But not everyone has the same income tax circumstances. There are people who have significant deductions, like monthly RSP contributions, child care expenses, or even deductible investment loan interest, which often result in a sizable tax refund each year.

If this describes your situation, you might be eligible for a Source Deduction Waiver. A source deduction waiver means that your employer could deduct less tax from your paycheque each month. If that’s the case, it will mean that you won’t receive a huge refund at the end of the year, however you will get more money every payday.

While it does feel nice to get a big refund every spring, you have to remember that this refund is your own money, which you have given to the government as an interest free loan for the past twelve months. I am sure you could come up with better ideas than of what to do with a little more money every month than the government does.

For the proper forms, go to the Canada Revenue Agency website, www.cra-arc.gc.ca, and search for form T1213.

If you are up to date on your taxes, the government will calculate the proper amount, and authorize your employer to reduce the tax withheld. Please remember that this is not automatically renewed, you do have to reapply each year.

Put a little more money in your own pocket next year.

 

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Filed under Employment, Saving, Taxes

Flaherty’s Changes to Mortgage Rules

What will the changes to Canadian mortgage rules announced on January 17 mean to you?

If you already have a mortgage – not much. If you buy a house within the next 60 days (before the changes take effect) – not much. If you plan on buying a house during the next few years – not much.

If you are ass deep in debt, and looking to refinance to the hilt with a nice low interest rate, flexible payment, Home Equity Line of Credit in order to bail yourself out – lots.

New rules will restrict the number of years you can stretch out a normal mortgage to 30 years. No more 35 year mortgages with CMHC. You will also need to come up with a minimum down payment. No more “no-money-down” mortgages.

But that’s not the big news. The big news is that the Government through CMHC will no longer insure Home Equity Lines of Credit – called HELOCs.

For the last number of years home owners have been flocking to the banks (and others) to refinance their homes with Helocs. This allows them to use the equity they have built up in their homes to refinance debts like credit cards, or buy things like fancy cars, boats and cottages, or heck, just pay for a trip to Aruba.

These Helocs are sold to people by highlighting the flexibility of the payments, the low interest rates and your ability to pay off as much as you want. In reality most people only pay the minimum interest payment, never reduce their principal, and will get killed if the interest rates go up by more than a percentage or two.

Helocs are a form of never-never plan. Most of them allow you to make minimum or interest only payments, and never actually pay down the principal. I  can’t tell you how many of these things I helped people convert into real mortgages during the last few years I was advising clients.

You could live in your house forever and never succeed in paying it off. These lines of credit are as bad as credit cards, they’re a guaranteed source of monthly income for the banks that you never escape.

And with their floating interest rates on a principal that never declines, they are a time bomb waiting to happen in a world where interest rates have no-where to go but up.

As soon as CMHC insurance for these Home Equity Lines of Credit dries up, expect to the see the banks pull back their helping hands, and tighten up their credit granting procedures.

With any luck Mr. Flaherty will have prevented the banks from letting a few unlucky people from getting in over their heads in the future. If these rules work as intended, uninhibited, intemperate consumer spending will be marginally reduced, and those least able to cope will be protected from the bank’s grasping fingers.

What can you do?

If you have one of these never-never plans, talk to your mortgage lender. You have two options, set up a declining balance payment, which will pay off both principal and interest – or – convert to a regular mortgage with a defined amortization and a fixed interest rate on regular monthly payments.

As soon as you can, stop giving your life away to the banks, and get your house in order.

 

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Filed under CMHC, Economy, Finance, HELOC, Home Equity Line of Credit, interest rates, mortgages, Saving